Electric Vehicle Demonstration - September 28-29

Electric Vehicle Demonstration Weekend at the Mall- You know an EV  might be your next car – So here is your chance to discuss, view, sit in, drive in, chat about, attend a seminar and learn about electric vehicles with owners and specialists from PlugnDrive – co-presented by Sustainable Orillia, PlugnDrive, Ontario EV Society and Orillia Square Mall – Sept 28 10-4 and Sept 29 11-3

The World Economic Forum - September 20

The Forum engages the foremost political, business and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas.

It was established in 1971 as a not-for-profit foundation and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. It is independent, impartial and not tied to any special interests. The Forum strives in all its efforts to demonstrate entrepreneurship in the global public interest while upholding the highest standards of governance. Moral and intellectual integrity is at the heart of everything it does.

Our activities are shaped by a unique institutional culture founded on the stakeholder theory, which asserts that an organization is accountable to all parts of society. The institution carefully blends and balances the best of many kinds of organizations, from both the public and private sectors, international organizations and academic institutions.

We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.”

Sustainable Orillia provides this weekly update from the WEP as a resource to our users.

https://mailchi.mp/weforum/lgbti-rights-worldwide-migration-maps-ai-reality-check-966933?e=b11d547cd7 

CBC "What on Earth" - September 19

A smart, snappy, constructive take on the state of the environment. We will highlight trends and solutions that are moving us to a more sustainable world, as well as what each of us can do, individually, to be more green.

https://links.lists.cbc.ca/v/443/6bfb647e3a526fecbedf67530ae15c8f883d807f31e94e9323f1f694ea285081

Presentation to Orillia City Council - September 16, 2019
Electric Vehicles — They’re Here Now! - September 14

Electric Vehicles — They’re Here Now!

— by Dave Vanalstyne, EV owner

On Saturday and Sunday, September 28-29, the Orillia Square Mall will be the home of Orillia’s first “EV Weekend.” Members of the Electric Vehicle Society of Ontario, Tesla owners, PlugnDrive—all will be there to welcome drivers interested in knowing more about owning an all-electric vehicle.

If you’re interested in owning an electric car, but don’t know where to get honest, independent advice about what the switch involves, one of the best places you can start is to talk to members of the “Electric Vehicle Society”—Ontario’s largest EV owners’ group.

It was founded in August of 1994 at a time when the only electric cars available were handcrafted one-offs. Today, members of the group help to organize education and test drive events like the Electric Vehicle Weekend coming up in two weeks. As a not-for-profit organization, it is our mandate to work with groups like Sustainable Orillia who are spearheading local initiatives to accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles and shift car culture towards a more environmentally sustainable future.

Representing over 1000 electric vehicle owners, the Ontario EV Society conducts Regional Chapter meetings, community outreach events, public presentations to community and school groups, advisory sessions with municipalities on fleet greening, and participates in government consultations.

The best ambassadors for EVs are those who already own an electric car, and we are pleased to announce that a new Chapter of the EV Society was formed this year in Orillia-Barrie as one of the 12 chapters spread across Ontario. To date 90% of Ontario’s population is within Chapter boundaries. As the Chapter lead for the new Barrie-Orillia Chapter and a resident of Orillia, I am delighted with the response we have had from EV owners since beginning monthly meetings in Barrie – and I welcome anyone who has an EV or is interested in learning about them to come and join us.

If you ask most people what name they think of when the subject of an electric vehicle comes up, the usual answer is “Tesla,” a brand that has raised the bar on what to expect in an electric vehicle. The reality, though, is that there are up to 50 all-electric (EV) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) models on the market to chose from. Currently, prices range from around $36,000 for a Kia Soul EV to $175,000 for a Tesla Model X P100D. IN spite of these costs, there are already 34,000 electric vehicles on the roads of Ontario.

As an owner of a 7-year-old, electric Nissan Leaf, I am adamant that I will not go back to gas. The car is fun to drive and when you add “economical” and “inexpensive” it is a great option for my in-town driving. I do not miss oil and filter changes, rad flushes, fan belt replacements and other maintenance requirements of gasoline-powered vehicles—none of which are needed with an EV.

It is this lower operating cost that causes industry analysts to predict major disruptions in the transportation industries. Consider the impact of on-demand, electric, autonomous vehicles (Uber without the need for a driver) and the inevitable reduction in costs. It is quite possible that there is a future ahead where far fewer people will even need to own their own cars – especially in cities.

The one question I get asked the most is, “How do you charge it up and how far can you go with it?” Today’s EV and PHEV owner has the option of charging at home on a regular 120 volt household plug (the slowest method, known as a Level 1) or installing a 240 VAC Level 2 charger (much quicker than Level 1). EV owners like myself will plug into a Level 2 charger in our garages after 7 p.m. when the hydro rates are at their lowest.

The original Nissan Leaf made its debut in Canada in 2011 with a 24 kWh battery and only about a 100km range, but batteries and ranges have improved since then. Battery density has risen, the sizes have shrunk and the capability to store energy has improved. The 2019 Leaf S Plus comes with a respectable 62 kWh battery with a range of up to 363 km on a single charge.

While batteries improve, prices drop and ranges increase, charging locations also multiply. There are now over 2,500 Level 2 chargers in Ontario located in public parking garages, car dealerships, public parks and at business that want to attract future customers. More are being installed daily.

In addition, there are at least 750 high-powered Level 3 chargers in the province and that number is growing. These chargers are capable of delivering enough power at 200 – 600 volts to bring a vehicle battery up to 80% of a full charge in as little as 30 minutes.

When traveling I have found that many hotels and businesses are willing to allow an EV driver to plug into an outdoor outlet with the on board cord-set for a level 1 charge when a level 2 or 3 charger is not available so you can recharge no matter where you are.

The point of all this? With some route planning and guidance from websites that help the traveller locate chargers, there are few places today that you can’t reach with an EV or PHEV.

Along with the growing public awareness of the benefits of BEV and PHEV ownership, the EV Society believes that, in spite of the nay-sayers, they are already practical for many–if not most—people to drive.

With the knowledge gained from speaking to EV owners, a new car buyer can now walk into a dealership confidently deciding to go with an electric vehicle.

But then again, he or she will still spend most of their decision-making time on the colour choices!

See you at Orillia Square Mall on EV Weekend!

_________________________

Visit https://www.autotrader.ca/newsfeatures/20190405/every-electric-vehicle-and-plug-in-hybrid-available-in-canada-in-april-2019/ for a list of EV and PHEV available in Canada.

Visit https://www.plugshare.com or https://chargehub.com for charging station locations.

Visit https://evsociety.ca for further information about the society.

The World Economic Forum - September 13

The Forum engages the foremost political, business and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas.

It was established in 1971 as a not-for-profit foundation and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. It is independent, impartial and not tied to any special interests. The Forum strives in all its efforts to demonstrate entrepreneurship in the global public interest while upholding the highest standards of governance. Moral and intellectual integrity is at the heart of everything it does.

Our activities are shaped by a unique institutional culture founded on the stakeholder theory, which asserts that an organization is accountable to all parts of society. The institution carefully blends and balances the best of many kinds of organizations, from both the public and private sectors, international organizations and academic institutions.

We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.”

Sustainable Orillia provides this weekly update from the WEP as a resource to our users.

https://mailchi.mp/weforum/lgbti-rights-worldwide-migration-maps-ai-reality-check-966929?e=b11d547cd7

CBC "What on Earth" - September 12

A smart, snappy, constructive take on the state of the environment. We will highlight trends and solutions that are moving us to a more sustainable world, as well as what each of us can do, individually, to be more green.

https://links.lists.cbc.ca/v/443/6bfb647e3a526fec8d81c753337e44c6883d807f31e94e9323f1f694ea285081

About Electric Vehicles – Trends, Pros and Cons - September 8

About Electric Vehicles – Trends, Pros and Cons

— by Stan Mathewson, EV owner

Recent developments in battery technologies and manufacturing, along with state and federal incentives, are helping transform electric vehicles (EVs) —cars and trucks — from being a niche vehicle, used by relatively few people, to being the “rational, economic choice” for many.

Most agree that the mass adoption of electric vehicles is close to the tipping point.  

Tony Seba, a well-recognized expert on disruptive technologies, notes that the electric car is such a technology. He points out that, just as in 1900 when the horse dominated the Easter Parade in New York City, so today, in 2019, the gasoline engine car dominates our highways.

Yet, by 1913, the automobile had completely replaced the horse.

Given the faster rate of change in 2019 compared to 1900, the electric car will be dominant in just a fraction of those 13 years. As prices of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles and battery electric vehicles (BEV) become comparable—likely around 2022—economics alone will cause this disruption.

In addition, there will be plenty of options for consumers. Automotive News recently reported that, by 2022, over 100 models of electric vehicles will be available from the major automakers and a few start-ups.

The Benefits

Economics. BEVs are more efficient and cheaper to maintain and operate than gasoline-powered vehicles.

No Green House Gases (GHGs). There are no tailpipe emissions. Ontario’s electricity is almost all generated from non-fossil fuel sources, so there are also almost no GHGs created when you drive a BEV in Ontario.

Efficiency. Energy costs money. So it stands to reason that the most efficient vehicle is likely to be the most cost-effective. The following graph demonstrates that a BEV is nearly 6 times more efficient than an ICE and over 3 times more than a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle.

If you are like the author and drive your Tesla Model 3 21,000 km in a year, your energy costs, including charging at Tesla Superchargers during long trips, would cost you around $300.

Performance. Most people know that the Tesla P100D is the fastest accelerating production car on the planet and, in fact, is a big 4-door sedan that is quicker than many pure race cars. Even more modestly powered BEVs have surprising acceleration due to the relatively high torque of the electric motor at low rpms.

Handling, braking, steering and ride are also important, and BEVs are on par with comparably-priced ICE vehicles.

Oh, and did I mention that they are QUIET?

Concerns

Range Anxiety. Often cited as the main obstacle to mass adoption by consumers, range is a consideration. However, if you are like the vast majority of automobile owners, you drive an average of 41 km per day (Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Resources). This means that you would be able to drive a BEV with a range of 300 km for 7 days before having to recharge.

“OK,” you say, ”but what if I want to visit family in Montreal—or Calgary—and I live in Orillia?” That is a consideration, so let’s talk about charging vs. filling the gas tank.

Charging. Over 90% of your charging will be done at home if you live in a single family home. If you live in an apartment or condo, the facilities for charging may not be available—yet. However, public charging stations are widespread.

Plugshare is an app that will lead you to the nearest charging station. There are more than you think.

 

Granted, even with the fastest charging stations such as the Tesla Superchargers, it does take more time than filling your gas tank. (By the way, when you set up your navigation on a Tesla, it automatically tells you where you need to stop to charge along your route.)

How much more? In a recent test, a Tesla driver took a trip of over 3,200 kilometres and spent five hours charging. (Remember that you can eat, shop, or sleep while your car charges.)

A 3,200-kilometre trip at 800 kilometres per day is a four-day trip. If you stop every four hours to take a break, eat and get gas, each stop will likely be at least 30 minutes. You will have used one hour per day times four days: four hours.

In short, the Tesla took only an hour more than you would if you filled up with gas and then ate, shopped or rested.

Reality Check

Price Difference. Currently there is a premium to purchase a BEV over a comparable ICE vehicle. However, there are many studies that show over five years, the extra cost of purchasing the BEV will be more than offset by lower operating, maintenance and repair costs. For example, a Tesla Model 3 and BMW 3 cost about the same to buy new, but over five years the Tesla will cost about two-thirds the cost of the BMW.

Also, you will need to buy a charger for your house and installation typically will cost a couple of thousand dollars. However, even with this cost — which will now be an asset to your home — you will still be many thousand dollars ahead after five years.

Maintenance costs. While this is considered in the section above on price difference, it is worth focusing a bit on this aspect. A typical ICE vehicle has several thousand moving parts while a BEV has a couple of dozen. The result? No engine oil changes, no transmission service or repairs, no pulleys or belts or cam chains to replace. Brakes can last 10 times longer because EVs have regenerative braking so you hardly have to use the brake pedal. And on it goes.

My Tesla 3 will need annual brake cleaning because of the road sand and a coolant change after four years. That’s it.

Range in winter. All vehicles use more fuel in winter than summer. However, BEVs suffer more than ICE vehicles. An ICE vehicle might lose 10 % range at 0 Celsius but a BEV will lose 20% or more. Why is this? An ICE vehicle uses its inefficiency (conversion of fuel to heat instead of motion) to heat the interior of the car, a BEV must use battery power to heat the interior.

Environmental Impact of Producing the BEV. Almost everything that man does has a negative impact on our environment. BEVs are no exception. Batteries in BEVs use rare earth metals and the mining and processing of these do have environmental impacts including the generation of GHGs. The batteries are recyclable and as yet it is not known just how long they will last.

Studies on Tesla Model S batteries since 2012 suggest that they will last between 25 and 32 years before being significantly degraded. Most research indicates that, over the complete life cycle of the vehicle, the BEV will contribute substantially less GHGs to the atmosphere than an equivalent ICE vehicle.

Summary

I can still recall being at Tesla School while we waited for our new Model 3 to be prepped. Every so often, one of us would be called and told that our new car was ready, and the instructor would say, “Great! One less tailpipe!”

I can’t begin to tell you how great it is to drive a BEV. It is fun. It is anxiety-free. It is quiet. The performance is unbelievable. And it is GHG free!

Are you ready to tip that balance and join the EV revolution? I sure hope so.